HUMN 303

Course Project- This course introduces vital areas of the humanities, such as the visual and performing arts, literature, history and philosophy.

Welcome

Greetings!  Your Course Shell provides you with several examples of possible assignments.  This LibGuide will address some of those while introducing resources to assist you with your research. These will fall in four broad categories.

Background Sources
These are resources to help you develop a basic understanding of a topic and perhaps help you locate resources for your Project.  These are typically online encyclopedias and dictionaries which are a useful starting point and helpful for background information.  These resources typically should not appear in your final draft.

Library Databases
There are online reference and periodical resources to which DeVry University subscribes.  You may be familiar with some of these while others may be new to you.

Books
Most of the Library's books are eBooks which can be read on your device.  You may also request print books from any of the onsite Libraries.

Open Access
There are a growing number of online journals which are usually free to the reader.  They are self-archiving and sometimes free of of copyright and licensing restrictions (you still must cite them in you use them).  Their costs are supported by publication fees paid by authors or are externally subsidized.  The quality of open access publications varies considerably.  Some are quite reputable while others are fronts for special interest groups. 

Course Project

Your final grade includes points accumulated for your

  • outline/proposal;
  • discussions;
  • an annotated bibliography;
  • a Final Paper; and
  • a Final Exam.

The following are guidelines to assist you in completing the course successfully.

Guidelines for Discussions: Please do not merely cut, paste, and attribute in the discussions. For every idea you paraphrase or language you quote, you must have at least two lines of your own original analysis, evaluation, or personal connection. Learning the humanities is not about finding information, but it is about engaging originally and authentically with what you are reading.

Guidelines for the Outline/Proposal: An outline is a convenience to help you tack down the topics you hope to cover in a Final Paper, and a proposal is the extended and full description of your project (as best you know it at the time of writing). Understand that you are making a best effort to describe your project early on, but allow yourself to be open to growth and change as you conduct research and focus your intentions.

Guidelines for the Annotated Bibliography: Good annotations make for excellent papers. You are required to annotate two academic scholarly resources in Week 3 and three additional resources in Week 3 for a total of five. A scholarly resource is written by an academic scholar, holding a Ph.D. or other terminal degree, is published in a multi-volume, peer-reviewed journal, and has ample references of its own.  Successful annotations begin with your introduction (to the best extent you know it at that point in time), capture publication details, briefly summarize a text, locate key terms, find controversies to analyze and evaluate, and assist in the creation of new knowledge.

Guidelines for the Final Paper: The essay must be nine to ten double-spaced pages in length (not including the title or reference pages). The margins should be no more than one inch (right and left). The essay should be composed in 12-point Times New Roman font.  Include a minimum of five scholarly sources. Other sources may also be used, but at least five sources must be academic and scholarly.  Dictionaries, encyclopedias, websites ending with the .gov, .org, or .edu, newspapers or other media sources do not constitute scholarship. All of the sources must be documented and cited using APA format.

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Library Skills

Introduction to Undergraduate Library
Research  

Logging In

Using Onesearch

Keyword Searching

Boolean Searching

Truncation & Wildcards

How to Read a Scholarly Article